Union County Conservation District Promotes Urban Cover Cropping

This week-long fair display was created by UCCD intern David Heitsman. He showed containers of UCCD’s cover crop and compared them with containers of different cover crop mixtures.  His emphasis was that homeowners should use the UCCD cover crop this year to get familiar with them and then may want to try different mixtures in the future. For example, if they have problems with compaction they may want to use a tillage radish or something with a tuber.

This week-long fair display was created by UCCD intern David Heitsman. He showed containers of UCCD’s cover crop and compared them with containers of different cover crop mixtures. His emphasis was that homeowners should use the UCCD cover crop this year to get familiar with them and then may want to try different mixtures in the future. For example, if they have problems with compaction they may want to use a tillage radish or something with a tuber.

As part of their 2014-15 Nonpoint Source Pollution Prevention Educational Mini-grant Project, Union County Conservation District (UCCD) promoted clean water by providing urban landowners with grain rye seed to use as a cover crop on their gardens. UCCD chose this mix because it has a good germination rate, withstands varying weather conditions, and is easy to kill off in the spring.

UCCD dispersed 240 bags of seed with an educational label at the Union County West End Fair, a local cover cropping field day, and a sportsmen’s day at Buffalo Valley Sportsman’s Association.  The label included information on preventing nonpoint source pollution, planting instructions, contact information, and a grant acknowledgment.

As part of the project, the district verified that a sample group of 20 individuals did in fact plant their cover crop. The district reports that everyone in the sample audience said that they would be willing to plant a cover crop on their own next year!

Financial and other support for this project is provided by the Pennsylvania Association of Conservation Districts, Inc. through a grant from the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection under Section 319 of the Clean Water Act, administered by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. epa_logo (2)

 

 

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Ag Progress Days 2015 – Volunteers Needed

volunteersclipartPACD will once again be exhibiting at Pennsylvania State University’s Ag Progress Days.  Volunteers at the PACD exhibit will help promote the important services conservation districts offer to Pennsylvania’s agriculture community.

Of the 45,000 expected attendees, over 60% are actively engaged in agriculture or related activities.  With so many farming families from across Pennsylvania attending this three day event, it’s a great opportunity to call attention to the work of Pennsylvania’s 66 county conservation districts.

This year’s Ag Progress Days will be held August 18-20 at the Russell E. Larson Agricultural Research Center at Rock Springs, Centre County, PA.  For more information, please visit http://agsci.psu.edu/apd.

District staff or director volunteers will spend about four hours at the PACD exhibit table to talk about the services the districts offer.  There are morning and afternoon shifts on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday; and an evening shift on Tuesday only.  More than one person from your district can attend a time slot.

If you can help, send your name, county, contact information, and what shifts you are available to tfisher@pacd.org as soon as possible.

 

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PACD Announces New Executive Director

Brenda J. Shambaugh will serve as PACD Executive Director. Photo provided.

Brenda J. Shambaugh will serve as PACD Executive Director. Photo provided.

The PACD Executive Board is pleased to announce Brenda J. Shambaugh as PACD’s new Executive Director. Brenda is a familiar face to PACD members and partners since she served as Government Relations/Policy Manager at PACD from 2005-2011. Most recently, Brenda served as Legislative Director at the PA Department of Agriculture – Governor’s Office of Legislative Affairs. In this position she was responsible for all legislative activity, serving as departmental liaison to the PA General Assembly, planning and implementing the agency’s legislative program, and managing staff for legislative research and relations.

Brenda has bachelor’s degree in political science from Dickinson College. She lives in Harrisburg with her family.

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Conservation District Board and Staff Complete Roadside Clean-Up

Pictured from left assisting with the cleanup are Pike County Commissioner Richard Caridi (also a Conservation District Board member), PCCD Resource Conservationist Marianna Quartararo and Pike County Commissioner Matt Osterberg. Photo used with permission from Pike County Conservation District.

Pictured from left assisting with the cleanup are Pike County Commissioner Richard Caridi (also a Conservation District Board member), PCCD Resource Conservationist Marianna Quartararo and Pike County Commissioner Matt Osterberg. Photo used with permission from Pike County Conservation District.

The Pike County Conservation District (PCCD) Board and staff recently completed their annual Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful road-side cleanup, maintaining just over two miles along State Route 402. This annual Adopt-a-Highway cleanup is completed in partnership with the Pennsylvania Department of Transportation’s Great American Cleanup of PA campaign.

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